Author Topic: Starting the final assembly on the E-Type - updated 3-1  (Read 7935 times)

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Online fflintstone

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Re: Starting the final assembly on the E-Type - updated 6-4
« Reply #30 on: June 19, 2015, 11:24:19 AM »
are shims like that expensive or hard to find?


Easy to find at online Jaguar parts vendors, and around $2.50 each -- so it's not a big expense.

For grins I looked on rock auto and found a lot of engine parts but no valve adjusting shims. motor mounts were cheap though. I did know the year or exact model so I did a 69 xke... 

while I am not working on jags most of my replacement parts come off amazon or rock auto. I shop most everything to death though.
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Re: Starting the final assembly on the E-Type - updated 6-4
« Reply #30 on: June 19, 2015, 11:24:19 AM »

Offline goodfellow

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Re: Starting the final assembly on the E-Type - updated 6-4
« Reply #31 on: June 19, 2015, 12:38:14 PM »
are shims like that expensive or hard to find?


Easy to find at online Jaguar parts vendors, and around $2.50 each -- so it's not a big expense.

For grins I looked on rock auto and found a lot of engine parts but no valve adjusting shims. motor mounts were cheap though. I did know the year or exact model so I did a 69 xke... 

while I am not working on jags most of my replacement parts come off amazon or rock auto. I shop most everything to death though.

You have tio go to specialty Jag vendors that deal in vintage parts -- XK Unlimited, Welsh Enterprises, Moss Motors, Terry's Jaguar, etc.. -- these are the big players in the Jaguar resto business.

Offline goodfellow

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Re: Starting the final assembly on the E-Type - updated 6-4
« Reply #32 on: June 26, 2015, 03:48:30 PM »
I've been gone most of the week and was able to get to this project only this morning. No big deal, because as expected, I didn't have enough of the required shim sizes in my inventory. I had to order some new stock and that took a day or two. Last Sunday I made a chart to determine the correct shims for my intake and exhaust clearances. The shims arrived a few days ago and today I went about installing and measuring the new settings. After a few hours I was pretty much "on the money".



Both the exhaust and intake cams were setup for a loose .012"-.013" clearance, which may reduce some cam noise without sacrificing idling characteristics and power.



The shims are less than $3 each and I had ordered a variety of shims to allow for +/- .001" variability of the final settings.



After everything was buttoned up, the static ignition and valve timing was checked one more time and this "rework" job is done. I'll leave the valve covers off for now until I add oil and attach the starter to give the engine a dry run so that I can see if the oil pump makes pressure and volume on the top end.





Finally, this morning I also picked up the flywheel from the machine shop. Sadly my old machine shop went out of business because the owners were over 70 years old and they all retired. That is the second machine shop closing in just a year's time -- young people just don't want to get in this trade and the old guys are retiring in droves. Given the situation, I was forced to go to the only automotive machining service left in my area -- NAPA. They did a nice Blanchard grind on this flywheel, but it cost about 40% more than I was previously paying at my old machine shops.



Time to put on the flywheel and throw some oil in the sump == Onward!
 

Online fflintstone

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Re: Starting the final assembly on the E-Type - updated 6-26
« Reply #33 on: June 26, 2015, 11:10:57 PM »
do you have to use the starter to check oil pressure or can you do it with a drill like an old school American V8?
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Offline goodfellow

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Re: Starting the final assembly on the E-Type - updated 6-26
« Reply #34 on: June 27, 2015, 10:41:22 AM »
do you have to use the starter to check oil pressure or can you do it with a drill like an old school American V8?

No, the dizzy is run directly off of the crank --

Offline goodfellow

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Re: Starting the final assembly on the E-Type - updated 6-26
« Reply #35 on: July 04, 2015, 04:47:25 PM »
Before I head out for some 4th of July merriment, I'll post these pics. They were sitting on my camera for quite a few days, but I totally forgot about them. The motor is pretty much done and ready for fluids and a test run.

The flywheel is a thing of beauty -- nice!!



I also used an old friend from the 70's -- Lord knows how many clutches this old Lisle adapter installed over the last 30 years --  a great tool!





Next came the transmission. Thank God I installed that electric hoist a few years ago, because at my age I just can't wrestle these things alone anymore.





It took a bit, but the transmission finally engaged the pilot bushing and clutch disk splines and it bolted up very smooth.





Lastly, attached the starter -- and it's a complete engine package again; only took five years -- LOL.



Well, I thought I was done, but then the OCD kicked in and I saw this scratched up plenum cover -- It bothered me when I rebuilt this engine, but now seeing the entire package together, it REALLY bothers me. So off it comes and will get properly finished and repainted.



Finally, the main wiring harness arrived, and I will install this over the next few weeks.



I'll leave the valve covers off until I spin this engine over at least once to see if I have oil pressure and flow to the top end.

Now it's time to build an engine run-in stand to test this rebuild to see if it's worth a damn.

Onward -- Happy 4th to all! Despite some of our domestic problems, we are truly blessed to live in this great country.

« Last Edit: July 04, 2015, 06:18:09 PM by goodfellow »

Online fflintstone

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Re: Starting the final assembly on the E-Type - updated 6-26
« Reply #36 on: July 10, 2015, 11:26:08 PM »
I think I had that clutch tool. all of the clutches I have bought in the last 10 years come with a plastic splined tool.
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Offline goodfellow

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Re: Starting the final assembly on the E-Type - updated 6-26
« Reply #37 on: July 18, 2015, 09:36:44 PM »
Today was a big day. I was finally able to finish my test stand and attach my leads to the starter motor in order to get this hunk of iron to turn over. The intent was to see that this rebuild was able to make oil pressure and have adequate flow to the top end.





I surrounded the head with some tape just to make sure the oil was contained in case the flow was too much.

Then I attached a mechnical oil pressure gauge, the starter leads and a remote starter switch to engage the bendix -- after a minute of crankiing I read the gauge and it went to 58psi



Sorry for the blurry pic, but the camera moved off of the engine stand perch while the engine was cranking -- it's close to 60psi and that made me very happy.

Oil was flowing to the top end -- and it was time to button this thing up. This thing takes almost 10 quarts -- so there is a lot of oil to move.



I polished all the black shiny things again and next week I'll install a temporary exhaust to actually start this thing up with fire -- can't wait.

After five years she's almost ready to start up and to be dropped back in the car.







I'm getting small things done in the meantime -- Onward.
 
« Last Edit: July 19, 2015, 10:06:48 AM by goodfellow »

Online fflintstone

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Re: Starting the final assembly on the E-Type - updated 6-26
« Reply #38 on: July 19, 2015, 11:04:37 PM »
looking good!
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Re: Starting the final assembly on the E-Type - updated 6-26
« Reply #39 on: December 12, 2015, 07:52:39 PM »
Well - time for an update on this thread. I've been working on the car, and after having the #5 cylinder hardened valve seat replaced, the valves were lapped and tested for a good seal. I basically just poured mineral spirits into the combustion chambers and waited to see if there were any leaks -- the valves sealed perfectly.





While I was at it I assembled the transmission mount -



... and finished wiring up the old bonnet bulkhead connector plug to the new wiring harness. Here are the pieces laid out for assembly. This is usually where you see problems because some folks just wire up the connector but forget to install the cup, retainer, and boot onto the harness before soldering the wires to the connector grid.







Unsoldering and uncrimping the old wires takes time, but to save the old grid it's well worth it.







Checking the fit to the bulkhead plug -- perfect!



Lastly I installed the new motor mount in preparation for the engine. The old mounts were only five years old, but looking at the pic, they were totally worn out by oil and gunk contamination.









I also needed to spray paint the transmission breather tube before engine install



.... and finally, it was time for the engine. Best way to do this job is to raise the front of the car and slide it in underneath. For that to work, oil filter, and the intake and exhaust manifolds must be removed -- not a biggie! They're relatively easy to install.



Once the engine is properly positioned under the car, the car is lowered over the engine. Then the engine is lifted with the cherry picker up inside the subframe just high enough to attach the motor mounts and drive shaft bolts. A hydraulic jack under the rear of the transmission is used in conjunction with the cherry picker to keep the engine level.

Engine is in the car --- yeah!!!







Onward -- and Merry Christmas!!!



Offline goodfellow

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Re: Starting the final assembly on the E-Type - updated 12-12
« Reply #40 on: December 13, 2015, 01:36:38 PM »
 I was browsing some of the old pics to get an idea for the layout of the original hoses, and I saw these pics from 2009. This is what it looked like when the engine was taken out. Took a lot of years, but I'm in the "home stretch".







Quite a difference --




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Re: Starting the final assembly on the E-Type - updated 12-12
« Reply #41 on: December 18, 2015, 05:48:21 PM »
I had some time yesterday and today to tackle one of the hardest jobs of installing a Jaguar XK engine in an E-Type body; the torque reduction plate, transmission mount and lower transmission splash shield. It's basically a fiddly frustrating job that never seems to go well the first time round.




The transmission mount needs to be compressed, while the center mount shaft needs to protrude through the center of the mount. So a regualar jack is out of the question. I opted to compress the mount using two bottle jacks (one on each side) to get it up far enough on the transmission to enable the bolts to get a bite.





There is a lot of pressure required to compress that spring and inner rubber mount



Next up was the splash shield. This is not a big deal, but since the torque reduction plate sits directly in front of it, it must be installed at this point because once the plate is in place the shield can't be installed.



Now comes the torque plate itself. It straddles the subframe rails, provides an anchor for the torsion bars, and also ties the lower subframe mounts to the body. This usually not a big deal, but since this car has undergone significant body work and welding, there is always a chance that the lower dimensions have changed somewhat -- which would make it very difficult to tie that plate into six body and subframe mounts. They all must align perfectly or that plate won't fit.

I lucked out in that I only had to scrape off some of the thick bedliner undercoat to make the plate fit into that tight space. Still, it took several hours to make it properly line up and bolt in place.



Finally the chassis ground strap was installed to make sure the electrical system was able to do its job.



Lastly the drive shaft was installed and the car is basically a full roller.

Next up under-hood wires, brackets, relays, and accessories. -- Onward!

Offline goodfellow

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Re: Starting the final assembly on the E-Type - updated 12-18
« Reply #42 on: December 20, 2015, 05:31:37 PM »
Worked a few hours to mount the accessories. It is obvious that the Series II cars with AC, Power Brakes, and Power Steering posed a big problem to Jaguar. They used a very haphazard way to mount and position these additional options because of underhood space constraints. All this "engineering" resulted in a very complicated mounting bracket design that is very difficult to position and attach to accessory drives.

This is the bracket in question ...



... part of it mounts directly to the block, while other mounting points must include water pump, power steering pump, and alternator bolts.

First up the power steering pump -- it can't be installed after the fact. Its primary mount is on the timing chain cover (see the missing bolt in the pic)





Then the "Frankenbracket" is installed with one specific top bolt that doubles as a water pump bolt with a washer/spacer. Notice that washer spacing in between the waterpump housing and the bracket itself. Without that washer, the bracket won't clamp on the water pump bolt and a leak might occur.





The top of the bracket serves as the alternator mount --



Below is a short mount for the upper power steering pump, while a long spacer is installed at the lower side of the pump to mount it to the timing chain cover bolt





Lastly I mounted the alternator. That was the easiest job of the day -- LOL



Done for today, but the front of the car is starting to look like a Series II E-Type





I'm waiting for two more secondary wiring harnesses that go under the hood -- once they arrive I can start laying out the electrical circuits in the engine compartment.

Onward!


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Re: Starting the final assembly on the E-Type - updated 12-20
« Reply #43 on: December 29, 2015, 07:08:43 PM »
Today I had enough time to lay out the main body harness in the engine compartment. I've had a chance to look at several offerings from various vendors that specialize in E-Type harnesses, and although they are all quite good, they do not have the same wire gauge thickness that was installed in the car originally. I know these are aftermarket, but the last time I installed a new harness (back in the late 1980's) you could still get an OEM Jaguar harness from the dealer, and it matched the original.



Laying these things out is no easy feat. Unlike many of the domestic harnesses, these are unmarked, and in many instances the color codes have changed when compared to the original wiring diagrams. Jaguar uses a unique wide "zip-tie" like system to fasten the harness to the frames, but instead of using up my new OEM ties, I loosely installed the harness with regular zip ties because there are many tweaks and bends needed to do a proper install.



I also installed the old piston-type AC compressor. It's quite impressive -- LOL





One of the many oddities with a series II  E-type is that AC and Power Steering was really an afterthought, hence some strange mounting choices had to be made. Case in point is this bracket that bolts to the exhaust manifold on one side and is used to secure the rear of the AC compressor. It's a real pain to install, and if the compressor were improperly aligned, the vibrations may cause the bracket to come loose and cause and exhaust leak.



Once the compressor was installed, I could plan the harness routing through the front of the frames. A jumble of hoses and suspension parts makes this a little difficult -- but the harness is cut very well to feed the accessory leads to the proper end-points.









The frames have appropriate clips for holding the harness in place, but for now they will not be used until all the circuit runs are properly fitted and positioned.



Two publications that I can highly recommend when assembling an E-Type are a large color coded wiring diagram from ClassicCarWiring.com, and the SNG Barratt Group "Parts Collection" manual. Two great resources that make the identification of sub assemblies and parts a whole lot easier.





Onward!!

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Re: Starting the final assembly on the E-Type - updated 12-29
« Reply #44 on: December 30, 2015, 05:35:25 PM »
Forgot to post these pics yesterday. The two left most exhaust studs are under a lot stress from having to share the AC compressor mounting bracket. In many cases the studs eventually come loose, and/or strip out. To mitigate this somewhat, I use JB-Weld epoxy to reinforce the stud. The aluminum heads are almost 50 years old, and the metallurgy wasn't the greatest to begin with. Hence, E-Type exhaust studs tend to strip out quite easily; especially in this corner area with that AC bracket mount.

I let it set up overnight and the studs are solidly in place ready to take the extra stress.



The compressor pump was filled to spec with 11oz. of NAPA brand R12 mineral refrigerant oil.





Finally everything was buttoned up and this exhaust side is done.



Onward --