Author Topic: Rare GTO option comercial.  (Read 958 times)

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Offline fflintstone

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Rare GTO option comercial.
« on: July 24, 2013, 09:14:50 AM »
1970 Pontiac GTO The Humbler VOE
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Rare GTO option comercial.
« on: July 24, 2013, 09:14:50 AM »

Offline fflintstone

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Re: Rare GTO option comercial.
« Reply #1 on: July 24, 2013, 09:16:15 AM »
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Offline 70redbee

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Re: Rare GTO option comercial.
« Reply #2 on: July 24, 2013, 08:44:10 PM »
Nice GOAT. Around my way it will get you a big fat ticket.
But it sure sounds nice.

Offline fflintstone

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Re: Rare GTO option comercial.
« Reply #3 on: July 25, 2013, 09:50:53 AM »
I sent the video to my oldest friend. We are gearheads from way back when. He asked me if Pontiac ever had a hipo version of their 6 cyl. I said I thought so and it was called the “sprint” package.
As it turns out my memory is not totally failing me.
From Wikipedia:
An overhead cam design was introduced by Pontiac in the 1966 model year. The Pontiac OHC-6 engine shared internal dimensions with the standard 230-cubic-inch (3.8 L) Chevrolet Straight-6, but had block and head castings unique to the OHC. Both head and block were cast iron; only the large cam carrier/valve cover was aluminum. The engine featured a Single Over Head Cam and was the base engine in the Pontiac Tempest.
 
The Pontiac OHC-6 engine was considered advanced by Detroit engineering standards at the time. It followed the Jeep Tornado I6 design, the first post-World War II domestic-developed and mass-produced overhead cam (OHC) automobile engine.[4]
 
The Pontiac's single camshaft was supported by journals within the aluminum valve cover; no separate bearing shells were used. The cam was driven by a glass fiber-reinforced cogged rubber belt, instead of the usual metal chain or gears, making it state of the art for the time, as well as very quiet. Valves were opened with finger followers (centered under the cam) that pivoted at one end on stationary hydraulic adjusters. The oil pump, distributor drive and fuel pump drive were not within the block, but were handled by an external jackshaft in an aluminum housing that bolted to the right side of the block. The jackshaft was driven by the rubber timing belt. The head had a single port face (exhaust and intake were both on the left side) and the valve stems were strongly tilted towards the left. This engine was used in the 1966 through 1969 Tempest and Le Mans, as well as in the 1967 through 1969 Firebird.
 
A high-performance version, called the Sprint, was an optional. The Sprint featured high-compression pistons, a hotter cam, dual valve springs, a split/dual exhaust manifold, a better coil, and it utilized the then new Quadrajet 4-barrel carburetor.
 
Like other Pontiac engines of the era, the OHC-6 was not available in Canada with the exception of the Sprint version of the Firebird. Canadian-market Pontiac automobiles were equipped with the Chevrolet OHV six.
 
The Pontiac OHC-6 engine ended production with the 1969 models.
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