Filtering used parts cleaner solvents.

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Offline rusty

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Filtering used parts cleaner solvents.
« on: November 07, 2010, 03:20:37 PM »
The solution in the old washer looks more like sludge then cleaner.

So I was wondering if anyone has ideas for ways to filter the solvents so they don't need to be replaced as often?
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Offline strik9

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Re: Filtering used parts cleaner solvents.
« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2010, 03:35:07 PM »
In the thread by GF, coffee can sediment trap  ( in the Homemade and Improvised section ) there are a few solutions posted.

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Offline rusty

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Re: Filtering used parts cleaner solvents.
« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2010, 03:40:08 PM »
There are a few new people on the board so I'm seeing if any new ideas pop up.

What do you folks use down that way? Do you usea special solution to clean the parts with?
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Offline strik9

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Re: Filtering used parts cleaner solvents.
« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2010, 04:38:25 PM »
We are not a sophisticated bunch , and with no OSHA  or EPA to deal with it leaves us open.
 Most every shop uses gasoline siphoned from the clients car.  Paint thinner for carbs and injection parts.
 Deisel shops have diesel in the parts washer, last forever without evaporation but long term exposure will get lead into your blood.
I have seen big dip tanks in the engine rectifier's shops, sorta smelled oil based but clearly acid based something.     
Our local AZ has the US approved stuff in gallons but I don't see anybody buying it yet.  Then again we can sell the used motor oil to local brick factories to burn for decent money.  Gotta love the frugal mind.

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Offline rusty

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Re: Filtering used parts cleaner solvents.
« Reply #4 on: November 07, 2010, 05:15:23 PM »
I've used either diesel or kerosene for years in washers. Works fine and lasts a long time.
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Offline Aunt Phil

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Re: Filtering used parts cleaner solvents.
« Reply #5 on: November 07, 2010, 08:35:27 PM »
Rusty is this on your usual budget of a kinked banjo string and a wore down guitar pick or are you willing to spend 92¢?

Things you can do with petroleum based solvents from gasoline to mineral spirits.

First and best thing to do is throw a chunk of ice into the cleaning tank.  Ice does a fantastic job of collecting and grouping the heavy grease in the tank, and yes it does melt, but in the process of melting performs a great collecting function.  If you're on the ball you can grab the tarball with an aquarium skimmer just as if you were working for the government on a La beach.  OK, maybe you gotta be alittle better than a government worker.

After the tarball trick you can let the tank settle a bit, the water and a lot more crud will drop to the bottom, and the tank will stratify as long as the solvent is below flashpoint.  You can draw off the somewhat cleaner solvent.  This part ain't a whole lot different from siphoning a gas tank (I really hope people still know how to).  Then you can class the act up with a coffee filter and a Buchner filtration funnel.  Those are real easy to make if nobody's watching the coffee machine at the local coffee shop, or if you know a pissed off waitress who is quitting.

If you want to get a little fancier you can combine sucking the top strata off the tank and filtration in a single process using a propane cylinder, a vacuum pump, and one of the toilet paper filter housings.  No vacuum pump, manifold vacuum and a long hose will work, either way you want to build a trap from a Mason jar and watch it.

At this point you have to decide if you want to clean further by distilling.  The still is pretty easy since most cleaners vaporize below boiling water, so all you really need is an old pressure canner and a waterbath.  You could probably build a solar collector on the back side of a metal roof and get sufficient temperature.

#2 Diesel, jetfuel and even kerosene get a bit more difficult given their desire for water, and tendency to form mayonnaise like crap. 

Of course should you be using water based cleaner, you really want to be nice to the neighborhood barber and have him save you up some used hair he cut, and find yourself some pantyhose without a woman in them.
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Offline rusty

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Re: Filtering used parts cleaner solvents.
« Reply #6 on: November 07, 2010, 09:07:16 PM »
Geetar pic heck man a dime works better. If ya's gotta use plastic then one of them rectangle plastic bread tie thinga ma bobs does a decent job.

Just cause they show my picture under the word cheap in the dictionary do'n means I wastes my cash.
Tool do job=Good tool

A 'Veteran'is someone who, at one point in his life, wrote a blank check made
payable to 'The United States of America,' for an amount of 'up to, and
including his life.'

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Offline Aunt Phil

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Re: Filtering used parts cleaner solvents.
« Reply #7 on: November 07, 2010, 09:41:51 PM »
Geetar pic heck man a dime works better. If ya's gotta use plastic then one of them rectangle plastic bread tie thinga ma bobs does a decent job.

Just cause they show my picture under the word cheap in the dictionary do'n means I wastes my cash.

Mea culpa Rusty.

NEVER did I mean to imply or suggest you're cheap.  Hey, if you were cheap you'd squeeze 3¢ worth of plantfood for the houseplants out of the buffalo o a nickle instead of only 2¢ like you do.

I completely believe your picture in that dictionary was a misprint.
© Aunt Phil 2011

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Offline B

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Re: Filtering used parts cleaner solvents.
« Reply #8 on: November 08, 2010, 05:10:10 PM »
It depends on what the solution is you can use pre-stage canister water filters for sediment to get out most in aquas solutions. For other check the plastic and filter compatibility so they do not degrade element or canister.  It is best to put the filter on the pump side and make sure it can keep up with the flow.

Re: Filtering used parts cleaner solvents.
« Reply #9 on: November 08, 2010, 08:06:36 PM »
On a semi related note, anybody want to get water out of fuel?

Racor Filter Funnel Demonstration

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Offline Fins/413

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Re: Filtering used parts cleaner solvents.
« Reply #10 on: November 09, 2010, 12:25:48 PM »
When I was a kid we had a boat for a time and my Dad had a large palstic funnel with very fine screen in it. He always used this to fill the tanks said it would keep the water out. I guess the surface tension is high enough to not let the water pass.
Eric Corse
Wake Forest, NC
1959 Chrysler New Yorker
1982 Ford Econoline

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Offline Dustin19

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Re: Filtering used parts cleaner solvents.
« Reply #11 on: November 15, 2010, 08:29:10 PM »
well i have a gallon jug of parts cleaner i forgot what kind it is but i got some of it from my old job were we had a safetykleen washer so it was probally there brand.. whenever i used it i just put 2 coffee filters in a funnel and pour it back in the bottle its still as clear as the day i got it :Peace:.

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Offline strik9

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Re: Filtering used parts cleaner solvents.
« Reply #12 on: November 20, 2010, 10:08:15 PM »
Rusty, here  are pics of how we do it in the shop.  I am aware that is a very crude method but it works.  You scoop  up the diesel from the bottom with a cup and pour it into the filter.  Scape up any dirt accumlated on the bottom with a metal plate, dump that into the filter.   
While far from a good system it does keep the diesel clean enough to use again.  This filter has about run its time.  The filtered product is golden/dark brown and free of grit.
« Last Edit: November 20, 2010, 10:12:21 PM by strik9 »

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Offline Aunt Phil

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Re: Filtering used parts cleaner solvents.
« Reply #13 on: November 21, 2010, 01:04:27 AM »
That filter is the kind of thinking I like.  I'm surprised you don't have to run a bolt through it to prevent the filter from floating.

Unfortunately it would be impossible to get away with around here, the damn Possum Policemen from DEC now invade repair shops looking for wash tanks and demanding to see the contract with SafetyClean or someone else along with pickup and purchase slips showing gallons handled.  The rest of their time they spend hassling corner stores about return bottle complaints.

They hassle you even more if you use the biodegradable cleaners.
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