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Author Topic: Starting on the front hubs - FINISHED!  (Read 43 times)

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Offline goodfellow

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Starting on the front hubs - FINISHED!
« on: August 22, 2010, 01:10:35 PM »
Most RWD American cars are pretty easy when compared to hubs on an E-Type. To R&R one of these you need two essential items; a hydraulic press and an O/A torch. Many a hub has been damaged beyond repair because someone tried to beat the spindle or the rotor off the hub by brute force.

Here is the culprit: front and rear views.







First thing to go is the caliper; a nice piece -- tripple piston design.



Then the spindle is removed from the hub. The ONLY way to get it out is with a press, and it will take a lot of pressure. When it breaks free, you'd swear that a shotgun went off in the shop.





Looking at the hub, I can see that it was recently rebuilt by the color of the grease and the new bearings that are installed. However, the bent seal shows that this hub was tightened way too much and would have ruined those bearings quite soon



Now comes the hard part. Unlike many American cars, where the brake rotor slips over the hub and is held in place by the wheel studs, these wire wheel hubs are fit to the hub with five bolts. BUT, since the slip fit tolerances are very tight the hubs will quickly rust onto the rotors. The only way to break that bond is with a torch. Glad I got my 50ft reel hung last week. This made setup very easy, and I was able to do the entire job outside --  thumbsup2

The old rotor is heated almost to an amber red color before it loosened up, and I was able to use a big socket to punch it out. It takes an incredible amount of heat to budge this much rusted cast iron.







Finally the caliper was separated and to my great surprise, the pistons were brand new (as were the dust boots). Not much to worry about here then.  Tomorrow the rebuild starts









Here all the pieces that make up a late model Series II E-Type hub --



Enough for today -- :beerdude:
« Last Edit: September 04, 2010, 01:50:19 PM by goodfellow »

Re: Starting on the front hubs -

Offline Fins/413

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Re: Starting on the front hubs -
« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2010, 02:02:05 PM »
Great job, does the blue grease mean its for a special purpose
Eric Corse
Wake Forest, NC
1959 Chrysler New Yorker
1982 Ford Econoline

Re: Starting on the front hubs -

Offline goodfellow

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Re: Starting on the front hubs -
« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2010, 03:56:25 PM »
No, it's just plain high temp wheel beaing grease Fins --

Re: Starting on the front hubs -

Offline rusty

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Re: Starting on the front hubs -
« Reply #3 on: August 22, 2010, 05:05:54 PM »
I always thought the pop sounded more like a hand grenade going off beside you.

I've seen ex military do the  duck and cover when it popped.
Tool do job=Good tool

 The things that will destroy America are prosperity-at-any-price, peace-at-any-price, safety-first instead of duty-first,
the love of soft living, and the get-rich-quick theory of life. - Theodore Roosevelt

Re: Starting on the front hubs -

Offline goodfellow

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Re: Starting on the front hubs -
« Reply #4 on: August 24, 2010, 08:03:32 PM »
Got a little bit done this evening on the hubs and the linkages.
The best way I've found to work these dirty and corroded parts is as follows:

1) Remove the dirt crust and undercoating with a scraper

2) Use drill mounted wire wheels to clean the parts down to bare metal

3) Wash and remove the last minute grease and dirt in the parts washer

4) Use the bench grinder with steel wire and brass wheels to strip oxidation and rust, and if appropriate, polish the piece to a deep shine with the brass wheel.

5) Media blast in preparation for paint if required

If the part is too large for the bench grinder, a high speed die grinder with steel and brass wire wheels will do as well.
I have two dedicated cordless drills set up with large coarse steel wire brushes. I also have two smaller fine steel wire brushes ready to chuck --



Here is the hub carrier frame ready for cleaning. Most of the heavy stuff is removed with a scraper, but after that, wire wheels do most of the work



... and the carrier after about 30 minutes of wire wheeling with the drills. It's ready for the parts washer, the bench ginder, and finally the blast cabinet. It was nickel plated, but the corrosion was just too much to try to save it. It will get media blasted and painted.



That miserable looking hub was scraped, wheeled with the drills, washed, and finally wheeled and polished with the bench grinder.





Finally the tie rod linkage was cleaned the same way, and since it's also nickel plated (and not very corroded) i was able to use the brass bench grinder wheel to bring it back to a beautiful original shine.










Re: Starting on the front hubs -

Offline Fins/413

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Re: Starting on the front hubs -
« Reply #5 on: August 25, 2010, 03:39:35 AM »
Now you are in the fun stuff, boy they cleaned up nice.
Eric Corse
Wake Forest, NC
1959 Chrysler New Yorker
1982 Ford Econoline

Re: Starting on the front hubs -

Offline goodfellow

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Re: Starting on the front hubs -
« Reply #6 on: August 28, 2010, 01:16:42 PM »
I was able to complete the hub carrier and the caliper today, but unfortunately the new rotors that I had ordered were the wrong part for this application. So back to the drawing board on that one. Here is the rebuilt caliper and and carrier -- everything nice and shiny!





The ball joint was easily replaced and greased with everything disassembled



The shrouds were media blasted, and although very corroded, looked pretty good with three heavy coats of black Valspar enamel



I mocked the whole assembly up without the rotors just to see what it would look like. That entire front suspension of this car is going to shine -- a very nice look.





« Last Edit: August 28, 2010, 02:06:44 PM by goodfellow »

Re: Starting on the front hubs -

Offline goodfellow

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Re: Starting on the front hubs -
« Reply #7 on: September 04, 2010, 01:49:52 PM »
Well, it took a week for the proper rotors to arrive and to finish up the RH assembly, but I managed to get everything completed.

One thing about the ball joints on E-Types I don't like is the top ball joint boot retainer clips. They are too big and allow a lot of grease and dirt to enter the socket. I ditched these clips, and just used some wire to tightly safety wire the boot with enough clearance to move up and down; yet remain snug enough to keep the grease inside and dirt/water outside.



The hubs were greased and new seals installed. These hubs take a lot of grease and should be packed pretty tight. The previous guy to work on these hubs totally forgot to pack the hub cavity. The plastic piping bag trick kept the mess down to a minimum.







New rotors get installed on the hubs with plenty of loctite --







The calipers, hoses and connections are next.







New pads and clips --





And finally the "safety wire" on the caliper bolts











Done!!! two completely rebuilt hubs, calipers, and rotors. These "only" took one-and-a-half weeks to finish -- LOL

Before:





After:




Onward!!! :beerdude:


« Last Edit: September 04, 2010, 03:44:02 PM by goodfellow »

Re: Starting on the front hubs - FINISHED!

Offline Fins/413

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Re: Starting on the front hubs - FINISHED!
« Reply #8 on: September 04, 2010, 04:10:37 PM »
Wow some pretty fancy engineering on those boys.
Eric Corse
Wake Forest, NC
1959 Chrysler New Yorker
1982 Ford Econoline

Re: Starting on the front hubs - FINISHED!

Offline goodfellow

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Re: Starting on the front hubs - FINISHED!
« Reply #9 on: September 04, 2010, 05:14:24 PM »
Wow some pretty fancy engineering on those boys.

.... and super heavy!!! Those things weigh a ton Fins. Glad this part is over; I have played way too much with wheel bearing grease this week. ----- LOL

Re: Starting on the front hubs - FINISHED!

Offline Fins/413

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Re: Starting on the front hubs - FINISHED!
« Reply #10 on: September 05, 2010, 06:56:39 AM »
I know what you mean, I hate repacking wheel bearings. I'm glad most of my stuff now has sealed bearings. Even wearing gloves it still gets everywhere.
Eric Corse
Wake Forest, NC
1959 Chrysler New Yorker
1982 Ford Econoline

Re: Starting on the front hubs - FINISHED!

Offline rusty

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Re: Starting on the front hubs - FINISHED!
« Reply #11 on: September 05, 2010, 08:55:13 AM »
Maybe I'm old fashioned. But I still prefer packing over the sealed.
Tool do job=Good tool

 The things that will destroy America are prosperity-at-any-price, peace-at-any-price, safety-first instead of duty-first,
the love of soft living, and the get-rich-quick theory of life. - Theodore Roosevelt