Author Topic: Emergency upholstery work!!  (Read 2220 times)

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Offline goodfellow

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Emergency upholstery work!!
« on: April 29, 2010, 03:53:43 PM »
Last week I had to do some emergency upholstery work -- also most of this week. On Friday I went to pick up a load of supplies at various places around town. My wife had the pickup so I was forced to use my trusty old Rodeo. Long story short, the car was totally loaded in back when I made my last stop to pick up some oil, degreaser and cutting fluid. When I went to the loading dock, the canisters didn't fit in the back so I had them put on the rear seat. When I got home, sure enough one of the cutting fluid canisters had leaked all over the rear bench seat. A whole half gallon on the stuff had soaked into the seat. "DAMN I should have used the truck!!!"   :cartangrys:

A new seat cushion was impossible to find, and a used bench seat was amost $450 -- so I decided to clean the seat myself. I stripped the seat cushion on the ground and proceeded to soak it with straight laundry detergent along with water form a garden hose. Then I used a sledge hammer as a weight to gently push on the foam cushion to squeeze out the dirty water and then release by adding fresh detergent and water. This agitation took three hours and most all the oil was washed out of the foam in that manner. The seat cover was first washed outside with detergent and water, and then given two cycles in the washing machine. Everything came out pretty good --

Today I put everything back together. Most all seats are upholstered and fastened this way, so the procedure is pretty common.

First I put the seat cover in the sun for an hour. This makes the vinyl flexible and I won't need a heat gun to smooth out corners and flats. The basic tools are KD  hog ring pliers and 1/2" hog rings. I got lucky, I got a bulk lot of differnet size rings so I'm good to go --





Here's the pressure washed frame, the clean foam cushion -- along with all the hardware







Most important are the "stays" that the hog rings will attach to



Stays are matched to the seat covers and the foam is matched up to the frame to be test fitted







The inner stays are done first. These little stays are attached to rods that are embedded in the top of the seat cushion. By attaching these little stays, the tops of the left and right seat areas will have a pleated outline. There are three per side -- so lots of hog rings needed for this job









Next the seat cover is pulled over the cushion and onto the frame -- most of the hardware (like these locking brackets) is attached at this point





The seat belt loops are attchached behind the locking brackets and fed through cloth sleeves to the front of the cushion and seat cover.
The cloth sleeves are secured with hog rings to the seat frame



Next the lower stay is secured to the frame -- it's best to work from the inside out in order to keep stretching the material evenly as I go along.



Nice and tight up front -- that tension is all due to the lower stay



Intermediate stay is inserted in the cover and secured with more hog rings







Finally the upper stay is secured and everything is given one more good stretch for overall tightness --





Done -- this took about two hours to complete. All the jacking tools are replaced and the seat is put back in the car.








Next time I'll take the truck when I pick up oil and supplies    :lol3:


 









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Emergency upholstery work!!
« on: April 29, 2010, 03:53:43 PM »

Offline uthscsaedu

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Re: Emergency upholstery work!!
« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2010, 12:37:30 AM »
Looks excellent but you forgot the "before" pictures.

I'm guessing cutting fluid is easier to clean than oil.

Offline goodfellow

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Re: Emergency upholstery work!!
« Reply #2 on: May 22, 2010, 08:12:45 AM »
Looks excellent but you forgot the "before" pictures.

I'm guessing cutting fluid is easier to clean than oil.

Cutting fluid oil has the viscosity of transmission fluid oil -- that whole bench seat was soaked in that stuff.

I never thought about before pics -- just too embarrassing!!
« Last Edit: May 24, 2010, 07:23:36 AM by goodfellow »

Offline uthscsaedu

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Re: Emergency upholstery work!!
« Reply #3 on: May 24, 2010, 03:00:23 AM »
Imagine spilling USED transmission fluid.  I believe that stuff stinks.

I once spilled antifreeze, also in an SUV.  Not on the seat, but in the back area, which is carpeted.

I immediately soaked the carpet with tons of water and tried to use a wet vac to suck it out.  Luckily there was no residual stickiness or odor.

Definitely not as much work as you went through.

Thanks for the picts.  It's always cool to see what stuff looks like inside.

Offline Fins/413

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Re: Emergency upholstery work!!
« Reply #4 on: May 24, 2010, 06:36:45 AM »
Imagine spilling USED transmission fluid.  I believe that stuff stinks.

I once spilled antifreeze, also in an SUV.  Not on the seat, but in the back area, which is carpeted.

I immediately soaked the carpet with tons of water and tried to use a wet vac to suck it out.  Luckily there was no residual stickiness or odor.

Definitely not as much work as you went through.

Thanks for the picts.  It's always cool to see what stuff looks like inside.
AF is water soluble that should have helped the situation.
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Offline rusty

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Re: Emergency upholstery work!!
« Reply #5 on: May 24, 2010, 09:39:56 AM »
I've had to use the water vac solution a few times on floors where the heater cores leaked.

It works well. My only problem then having to do the rest of the floors.

Since the area below the core looked so good after the repeated soakings and vacs. I had to do them all.
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