Starting the final assembly on the E-Type - updated 5-10

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Offline goodfellow

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Re: Starting the final assembly on the E-Type - updated 3-1
« Reply #75 on: January 27, 2018, 01:44:02 PM »
Door assembly: This is one of the most frustrating tasks that any E-Type owner has to face. The doors are are flimsy and the fittings are pure crap. Jaguars were not made toe exacting standards -- in the 1960's exotic sports car world, they rated at the bottom of the quality scale. Nowhere is this more evident than in the doors. The parts and hardware are marginal, and the design is third rate. Putting a door shell together is mind numbing and frustrating, and is further complicated by the fact that documentation for later year E-Type doors is non-existent. -- So here goes!!

After extensive rework and painting, all the studs and hardware need to be thread chased top clean up the threads.



Then the most important piece is to make sure you have a water drain hose inside the door running down from the top to the bottom -- I can't show a photo, but the top drain is visible from the outside of the door close to the hinges. Under this drain (on the inside of the door is a plastic tube that clips inside the door skin (it's hidden and you have to feel around for it with your hands.



Next loosely install the lock mechanism and the guide.



Next very loosely install the two window frame alignment "L" brackets on the studs that protrude inside the the bottom of the door. There is one long and one short bracket -- the short one installs at the from of the door and longer at the rear. The slotted end of the bracket is fastened to the door stud while the round end fastens to the window frame.











Then I inserted the widow regulator into the cavity of the door and loosely used two bolts to attach it on the inner door skin to temporarily get it out of the way of the window and frame (which comes next).



The regulator is just loose, and I have to remind myself that this reinforcing bracket resided underneath the inner door skin wedged between the regulator. This is how it positions (but underneath that inner skin).



Now the window is inserted into the frame and they are both slowly positioned inside the door. It's easier to move the window half way down in the frame to maneuver the lower
window metal track over the lip of the freshly painted door. Once it's clear, the frame can be pushed all the way in.







Next comes the really painful part -- attaching the regulator to the window track itself. At this point I removed the loose bolts that temporarily held the regulator out of the way and freed the regulator. This allows the regulator to freely move independently inside the door. The window is pushed all the way down in the frame and the regulator positioned so that the guides can be inserted into the tracks. This takes patience and maybe a second pair of hands to hold the frame while regulator is moved back and forth inside the door.





Once the regulator is in it's tracks it's important to attach the window frame loosely to the previously installed "L" brackets or the slides can jump out of their tracks.
Now the regulator can be adjusted and repositioned to align with its mounting holes, but before the crank mechanism can be attached, the stiffener must be inserted between the mechanism and the inner doorskin.



Next the door release mechanism is installed in the bottom of the door. It's long arm attaches the door lock mechanism with a clip. To make this job easier, the window is moved half way up in the frame to allow access to the door lock.











Installing the door handle is fairly straight forward -- insert the handle and attack the rod to the lock with a clip -- not a big deal at this point.



The rest is fairly straight forward -- the hardest part is done. I manged aged to get both my doors done this weekend and they will get handed off to the upholsterer for further finishing work.

BUT!! The door frames need to be fitted to the door openings. This is done through the use of door frame shims that are inserted between the upper door edge and the door frame base.





I took note of the shims that were initially installed, but the car doors were extensively reworked -- hence the shims will need to be readjusted to ensure the frame sits evenly in the door opening



Onward!!

 

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Offline fflintstone

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Re: Starting the final assembly on the E-Type - updated 1-28
« Reply #76 on: January 28, 2018, 07:25:30 PM »
Glad to see you are back on it.....
THE KING OF PARSIMONY WHEN BUYING TOOLS

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Offline goodfellow

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Re: Starting the final assembly on the E-Type - updated 1-28
« Reply #77 on: February 10, 2018, 07:27:43 PM »
Glad to see you are back on it.....


Thanks Bill --

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Offline goodfellow

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Re: Starting the final assembly on the E-Type - updated 1-28
« Reply #78 on: February 17, 2018, 10:04:32 PM »
I screwed up a bit and I realized today that I waited much too long to install this "bear" of a lower radiator hose. I left it off on purpose when I began to reassemble this front end because it made the installation of smaller and more delicate front parts and wiring harnesses much easier. In retrospect it was a mistake because what seemed like such a simple procedure took almost two hours to accomplish.

The problem is this contraption -- a two-piece lower radiator hose connected by a sleeve.



I cut the old hose clamps with an abrasive cutter because they were totally corroded onto the hose.



I cleaned and painted the sleeve and new clamps and a new "OEM" set of hoses were on hand to do this "simple job" -- boy was I wrong!







Jaguar stuffed a great many things into that front section behind the radiator -- there is very little room.





The problem occurred when I tried to attach the top section of hose to the water pump. This section of OEM hose has a wider opening on top (where it attaches to the water pump) than on the bottom (where it attaches to the top of the sleeve). No matter how much I tried, that wider top section could not be forced over the pump outlet. I tried silicone, grease, even engine oil to make that damn thing slide -- no deal.

This is supposed to be a simple install, but out of frustration I finally tried the old hose. It slid on without problem. I measured both hoses and the pump outlet tube and found out that the new "OEM" hose was about 3/16" too small. How do you stretch a thick radiator hose? I tried all kinds of ideas, until I decided to stick the end of the hose in a pot of rapidly boiling water and let it sit there for 15 minutes. Then I ran into the garage, sprayed some silicone on it and it finally slid home.







This is the kind of stuff I hate about new OEM-spec Jag parts. They are not always to spec and often inferior to the original -- and in those cases they cause a great deal of frustration.


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Offline goodfellow

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Re: Starting the final assembly on the E-Type - updated 1-28
« Reply #79 on: February 20, 2018, 01:51:10 PM »
Not very exciting, but necessary. These rear window and door seal molding channels were removed from the body because there was a lot of rust hiding beneath them. They needed to be straightened, stripped and painted. It's a pain to straighten them because they are very flimsy.



The rear window channels are riveted and glued to the outside of the window opening, but first the old adhesive needs to go and the old rivet holes straightened to make it easier to insert the rubber window seal.





I used these little detail hammers that I got from Harbor Freight many years ago and they are perfect for getting into the small channel opening.





It's a royal pain, but if these things don't sit flush there's hell to pay trying to slip on the seal.





The front door edge molding channels were a bit easier, but more corroded. I straitened and stripped them and applied a lot of etching primer to keep them from corroding any more.





Everything stripped and ready for paint --





Cheap Chinese gravity feed detail gun is perfect for this job --





The weather was a nice dry and warm 75º F; perfect for painting outside.



While I was at it I also prepped the left inner fender panel with rubberized undercoat and set it up for paint -







Not very exciting work, but it does get me closer to having the interior trim and upholstery work done.

Tomorrow I have to rivet and glue these channels into place.

Onward!


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Offline goodfellow

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Re: Starting the final assembly on the E-Type - updated 2-20
« Reply #80 on: February 23, 2018, 06:30:22 PM »
Started to go through some of the last boxes and found many small items that were always shoved into the "I'll do it later category!", but now they need to get done. This RH inner fender shield needed to be stripped, disassembled, and straightened.

The rubber seal on top is trash, and a new one is on order -- but the clamping strip and side anchor bracket are totally rusted. New ones will have to be fabricated out of 18ga steel









I used the old propane torch to strip the old undercoat and then it was off to the blast cabinet for a good cleaning. After that, it received two coats of etching primer and it was rebuild and painted in rubberized undercoat and hammered paint. It's cure for a week and then get hit with IH Red body color.





Lastly I needed to clean and strip these aluminum frame mounting brackets -- they mostly hold undercarriage and torsion bar splash shields to the square tubular subframe. The media blasting did a great job on this aluminum alloy the brackets were immediately ready for etching primer and paint.





Black Valspar enamel is perfect for these brackets -- very tough stuff.





Not that many frame and engine compartment parts left to go.

Onward!
« Last Edit: February 23, 2018, 07:10:27 PM by goodfellow »

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Offline goodfellow

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Re: Starting the final assembly on the E-Type - updated 2-23
« Reply #81 on: March 18, 2018, 04:40:19 PM »
There are lots of little details left to do as well as some more trim and headlight bucket painting. I'll have to wait for a warmer day to paint, but in the interim I tackled the torsion bar splash shield (or protective shield as listed in the catalogs). I don't know why they call it protective? It's basically a thin sheet of soft aluminum.





First off, these things are expensive from the usual on-line sources, but there is a marvelous company in Delaware that a die hard Jaguar nut started in order to fill the need for quality restoration sheetmetal and trim pieces -- The company is called Monocoque Metalworks -- and is run by a talented gent named Chuck. He produces panels of much better quality and fit AND price than the traditional sources. Case in point; these splash shields. The usual sources wanted between $145 and $170 (not inc. shipping) for these two panels. Chuck makes them in-house and ships both shields for $75. Wish I would have known about this company sooner -- they make excellent replacement panels and they are growing.

http://www.monocoque-metalworks.com/main/

I also installed the chip deflector shield for the air cleaner -- this is where these pesky frame brackets come into play. I painted these things last week and they hold these shields (among other things) in place on the sub-frame members.





The torsion bar shields installed with regular 7/16" screws and nuts -- and they are an exact fit. No trimming was required (as is usually the case with other "OEM" sourced panels).





Finally I addressed the low pressure and fill hoses of the power steering system. The low pressure hose attaches to the rack and pinion with a fitting and returns fluid to the frame mounted reservoir. The fill hose is just a plain oil resistant hose that feeds the pump (no fitting required -- just hose clamps). The original hoses were hard and damaged and the fitting on the low pressure hose was crusty.









I removed it, cleaned and painted it, and ordered some replacement hose.





I will not be using a clamp (as the factory hose did), but rather a ferrule connection to make it more presentable and sturdy. The ferrule needed to be modified a bit, but this will be a much better solution.





This week I'll try to paint the last bits and pieces, and get the undercarriage splash shields prepped and installed.

Onward!


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Offline Uncle Buck

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Re: Starting the final assembly on the E-Type - updated 3-18
« Reply #82 on: March 19, 2018, 02:43:50 PM »
Man you have really come a long way with this GF!

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Offline goodfellow

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Re: Starting the final assembly on the E-Type - updated 3-18
« Reply #83 on: March 20, 2018, 05:49:23 PM »
Thanks Herb -- going on nine years working on this project. If I were retired it would've probably taken longer ---   :lol2:  :lol2:

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Offline fflintstone

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Re: Starting the final assembly on the E-Type - updated 3-18
« Reply #84 on: March 23, 2018, 04:26:02 PM »
I am glad you are back at it. my wife was away for a week and I thought I would try to get some of the kitchen cabinets done. i failed to finish, but the dishwasher we bought 6 years ago finally is hooked up. i have a sink but no counter top or faucet yet.

It is finally warm enough to pull the vette out of storage so it is warm enough to start working on car stuff...
THE KING OF PARSIMONY WHEN BUYING TOOLS

foxtrot union charlie king oscar bravo alpha mike alpha.

World class master Mechanician

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Offline goodfellow

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Re: Starting the final assembly on the E-Type - updated 3-18
« Reply #85 on: March 23, 2018, 06:19:42 PM »
I am glad you are back at it. my wife was away for a week and I thought I would try to get some of the kitchen cabinets done. i failed to finish, but the dishwasher we bought 6 years ago finally is hooked up. i have a sink but no counter top or faucet yet.

It is finally warm enough to pull the vette out of storage so it is warm enough to start working on car stuff...


Good that you're getting back at it as well Bill. Me, I absolutely hate home improvement type work -- simply did enough of it over the last 40 years that i can't get near it anymore.

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Offline goodfellow

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Re: Starting the final assembly on the E-Type - updated 3-18
« Reply #86 on: March 29, 2018, 03:47:12 PM »
It's been ten days since I've had a chance to work on this thing. Mainly because the wife's "Honey do!" list was quite long, but now has been whittled down to almost nothing. Spring time is always tough because my wife really gets excited about the season and plans a lot of projects around the house. I was finally able to get back on this today -- 77 degrees and it was perfect for painting the last pieces -- namely the headlight buckets and the inner fender splash panel.





While I was waiting for the paint to dry, I crimped up the power steering pump fitting into a new piece of hose and installed it on the car. The PS reservoir hoses that lead down to the pump have to thread through a jungle of other hoses (AC, brake, vacuum, and EGR), and it make the placement and installation very difficult. I used my Mastercool manual crimping press to do this crimp and it worked fairly well -- nice and tight.





E-Types were really never designed for this mess of hoses, and besides it always makes them look very untidy with all those hose support clips and brackets hanging off those beautiful sub-frames.









The last PS hoses are installed and ready to go -- now I'm waiting for some correct OEM brake and clutch reservoir fluid hoses to show up, and the hose jungle on the driver's side will be done with.

Onward

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Offline goodfellow

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Re: Starting the final assembly on the E-Type - updated 3-18
« Reply #87 on: March 30, 2018, 06:22:08 PM »
I diddled around with this all afternoon. The right inner splash shield that I painted yesterday was a BEAR to install. Not because it wasn't true and correct, but it had to mesh with the lower stone shield and the air intake shield. Three separate pieces that must be juggled together to make a cohesive and clean install. It's a royal PITA -- but now it's done.

Lower shield is in place, but since Jags were so poorly fit at the factory, fitting these panels back up after a resto is maddening.



air cleaner duct shield also hangs in that mix.



... and finally the splash shield. If this isn't sitting right, then there's a good chance the bonnet won't close properly once it's installed. I must have trial fit and tweaked these three pieces and their respective hangers 20 times. Finally got it to where everything fit up nice and even.



On the positive side, my new parts arrived -- including a brand new Smiths clock that will take the place of the Rube Goldberg version that I installed a few months back .

Tomorrow the other side splash shield gets installed -- Onward!!

« Last Edit: March 30, 2018, 06:32:55 PM by goodfellow »

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Offline fflintstone

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Re: Starting the final assembly on the E-Type - updated 3-18
« Reply #88 on: April 02, 2018, 11:01:01 AM »
Any realistic thought on when it will be "driveable" (they are never "done)?
THE KING OF PARSIMONY WHEN BUYING TOOLS

foxtrot union charlie king oscar bravo alpha mike alpha.

World class master Mechanician

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Offline goodfellow

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Re: Starting the final assembly on the E-Type - updated 3-18
« Reply #89 on: April 03, 2018, 05:36:09 PM »
Any realistic thought on when it will be "driveable" (they are never "done)?


If everything goes smoothly -- by the end of summer.